The Hold Steady announce re-releases and old band getting back together

holdsteadyGood news for fans of loud, Springsteen-ian guitar rock and roll with intelligent, soul-grabbing, blue-collar, Lou Reed-ish spoken lyrics, majestic piano, and essential gritty rock that transcends easy classification. The Hold Steady is celebrating their Our Boys & Girls in America album, which turns 10 this year

From the band…

“we are very excited! We will be playing a limited number of live shows this fall to celebrate. Our old friend Franz Nicolay will be joining us. More info on the first few shows will be available Wednesday, May 18. Mark it on your calendar!

“One apology: The plan was that today was going to be the day releasing the precise info on everything. Unfortunately, some details with our co-conspirators changed and it required waiting two more weeks on the details.

“Also, we are finally reissuing Almost Killed Me and Separation Sunday on VINYL this fall on Frenchkiss Records.

“Stay Positive! It’s about to get incredible!”

The Hold Steady.

Love that they are getting together with former piano player Nicolay, who lent a certain gravitas to their music and is associated with their glory days….

 

VIDEO – Bruce Springsteen – “Human Touch” – Live in Australia

Bruce Springsteen just wrapped up a month-long residency-of-sorts in Australia, touring from west to east, and finishing up in Brisbane on February 26 with what is being called one of his greatest shows ever: a nearly four-hour long set that swerved away from the setlist after the first song, and included a live, in-sequence take on entire 1973 album The Wild, The Innocent, and the E Street Shuffle.

But here’s the hidden secret: it was a few nights before, on February 23 at a place called the Hope Estate Winery, that Bruce blew the doors off “Human Touch”, a forgotten, 1990’s non-E Street song that, in the middle of a winery,  captured his – and the band’s – skills, all in high gear.  Start with what is at the end: a long, impassioned, rising, killer guitar solo.  The song, in slow-burn early, builds slowly. Mid-song, check out how he waits.  And waits.  And waits some more for the right moment to kick it in after resting on drummer Max Weinberg’s 1-2-3-4 cymbal ride.  Here’s the YouTube clip.  How the hell does he create a rock and roll gospel-like firestorm at nearly every show?  Don’t know, but the audience is blessed.

read more about the Australian shows