VIDEO: Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers – LIVE – “American Dream Plan B”

petty2014Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers remain one of the finest American rock bands around – and much of the reason (besides the talent) is work ethic. They keep touring and rocking and recording new music that sounds like …Tom Petty.

The new album Hypnotic Eye has led to a tour of the US.  He kicked it off with a pretty cool Jimmy Kimmel Live concert from the band’s rehearsal space.  Turn it up. Love the Mike Campbell guitar…

NEWS: Petty’s new album scores #1 spot; best first week for Petty since 1994’s Wildflowers album – Read Story  /

Part of the reason for Hypnotic Eye’s impressive performance is due to a concert ticket promotion for Petty’s ongoing summer tour. Those customers who purchased tickets through agents like Ticketmaster were presented with the option to also buy Hypnotic Eye. Though many declined the option, all redeemed copies were counted in Billboard’s official sales. Interesting…

 

 

 

 

Avett Brothers Live webcast October 30 with Live on Letterman

avettQuietly, David Letterman has quietly built quite the music legacy.  His Live on Letterman webcasts have been featuring bands like Mumford and Sons, Taylor Swift, John Mayer, Kings of Leon, Adele and lots more.  Recorded in the hours before the show airs on TV, but just after the talk show is actually taped, it’s a up-close, high-production, intimate venue featuring bands letting loose for the audience sitting in the same building where The Beatles performed on the Ed Sullivan Show

Coming up on October 30, a particularly noteworthy show is worth catching. Fans can watch the Avett Brothers’ webcast live or on-demand. Also during CBS.com’s live webcast, fans will have access to  multiple camera angles, and the ability to pick the last song in the band’s set.

According to the Letterman show, the performance will feature songs off of their newly released album, Magpie and the Dandelion, including “Another Is Waiting,” as well as songs from their previous albums 2012’s The Carpenter and the band’s 2009 major label debut, I and Love and You.

Additionally, the webcast is available live and on-demand on Radio.com, and on-demand via the CBS App for iOS, Android and Windows 8.

James McMurtry and The Bottle Rockets pair up for Rathskeller show on July 11

bottlerocketsA rare appearance in Indianapolis for a pair of Americana bands/singers/songwriters/rockers.  On July  11 at the Rathskeller, The Bottle Rockets – the pride of Festus, Missouri – bring their American rock and roll to the Rathskeller, followed by Texas’ James McMurtry.

The Bottle Rockets have been through town occasionally, my favorite time when they opened for Todd Snider and the Nervous Wrecks back in 1997 at the Vogue.  Lead singer Brian Henneman is one of the great blue collar, deep-if-you-really-think-about-it writers of the genre, and will forever be remembered as guitar/tech/roadie/traveling companion for seminal alt-country band Uncle Tupelo.

mcmurtryMcMurtry’s first album was recorded just outside of Bloomington, with Mellencamp’s band, back when the lineup still featured Larry Crane, Mike Wanchic, Toby Myers and Kenny Aronoff.  Since then, he’s created some stirring, challenging-your-beliefs albums, and has risen to legendary status within the Americana music community.

This is one of those shows featuring a pair of bands well-known to a certain segment of music listener, and completely ignored by radio and mainstream music.  Indy has a habit of supporting these types of bands (use Will Hoge and Old Crow Medicine Show as a couple examples.  Both artists have a strong following in Indy) and outdoor shows at the Rathskeller are always a good time.

*6:30pm start for the Bottle Rockets, 8:15 for McMurty.

Tom Petty Albums: The Essential 7

tom petty1 As Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers hit the road for a summer tour, their Indianapolis stop on Saturday night (June 15) is the first after multi-night stands at small theaters in both New York and LA.  The band heads to Bonnaroo the day after  Indy, so this will be the first outdoor/shed/large venue show of the trek – not that it should matter.  Petty always rocks.  This time, however, they have decided to scatter a few hits while hitting  a lot of great forgotten album tracks.  Hell, they are playing “Tweeter and the Monkey  Man”, one of the great, largely buried cuts from the first Traveling Willbury’s album.

tompetty2If there’s one band that best represents American Rock music in the past 30 years, I’d give the title to Petty & the Heartbreakers. Sounding not from one place (belying the band’s strong Florida roots), but from everywhere. It enables them to connect with rednecks and hippies, east coast attitude and west coast shine. They can rock loud. Tom can be acoustic quiet. Lyrics resonate. Petty can sweat and smile at the same time. It is a band that has been making music for almost 40 years, the most recent album, Mojo, released in 2010. That record is both a departure for the band, and a rejuvenating set of music. I’m a big E Street Band and Pearl Jam fan, but still give the nod to the quintessential American rock and roll to Petty and his boys when it comes to the package of  accessibility, passion and sweet-ass rock and roll hooks.

Here for you, my friends, is the Rockforward list of Petty’s 7 Essential Albums (and a couple that were too good to leave off).

Continue reading “Tom Petty Albums: The Essential 7”

Indiana Music: Dane Clark and Larry Crane team for an Americana Review

daneclarkOriginally written for NUVO – published December 19, 2012

As the engine the makes John Mellencamp’s band rumble, Dane Clark sits behind a drum kit, driving the roots-rock sound. With his own band and album, he stands squarely in front, with a guitar and directing his own take on the heartland rock sound.

Clark and his band will team with another Indiana rock and roller, as they are joined by Larry Crane’s band for a night of heartland rock on December 20 at the Bluebird in Bloomington.

“The seeds of the idea for this show came from a live acoustic show we did in the WTTS Sun King studio last summer with Larry and Jennie Devoe,” Clark says. “I’ve been thinking about doing an Americana Review-style show, and this will be a good way to start.

“We will run the show with both bands set up to save time, and I will do a couple songs [and] he will do a couple songs,” he says. We’ll sit in with each other’s band. We will do our own music, and so will he, and throw a few Mellencamp chestnuts in their too.”

New sounds, unexpectedly made

“I think I did intend to go deeper into the Americana steel guitar and dobro sound,” Clark says, as we talk about his new album. “Records don’t ever turn into the one you envision as you go through the process.”

daneclark_albumThat said, Clark’s Songs from the Hard Road resonates with splashes of radio country and Mellencamp-inspired Lonesome Jubilee porch sounds. It’s a record that solidly based in the sound of Middle America.

“You’ve got to be realistic in the music business,” Clark says. “Nobody buys music anymore. You write songs so you can sing, get a band and go out and play. I love music. I have a great band that can pull it off.

He knows even the big guys don’t have the same power.

“One has to realize the state of the music business in 2012. Bruce (Springsteen) can put out a record, and it doesn’t sell like it did 20 years ago. What we make is modern music for adults. I hope people find a song that radiates – a lyric with a spark of truth.”

daneclark2Clark, who started playing piano when he was very young before moving to guitar and drums, realized that he “wasn’t going to be Jimmy {age or Elton John” but that he “could play like Keith Moon and John Bonham.”

“A drummer in a live setting is steering the ship. He’s the engine. With my band, I trust my drummer to be that engine.”

“I hope we can crack a little bigger audience,” Clark says. “It’s more about a few degrees of success – working to get to the next level.”

Reconnections

One of the side trips Clark has taken with the record is a reconnection with the legendary late 1960s rock band Moby Grape. After being enthralled by the band’s debut album (“It was life changing for me,” he says) Clark had a chance – many years later – to meet guitarist Jerry Miller and do some recording and touring with the group.

Clark connected with Miller when he used his Mellencamp pass to get backstage at Pine Knob in Detroit in 2007 for a ’60s-based Summer of Love show. It has led to the new album’s closing track “Over It” featuring the band – a chance for Dane to finally get the group together for an album track.

“Anything bad that could have happened to the band, did,” Clark says, of their history. “They only got the name back two years ago. There have been a lot of mishaps, but it was a great thing; five guys, and all five wrote and all five could sing. They were overloaded with talent.

It’s a relationship to a band that Clark is especially proud of, and you can hear the warmth in his voice when he talks about the San Francisco rockers.

Sounds of home

“I don’t know if there is an Indiana sound,” Clark says, when I ask him if there is such a thing. Though I believe there is, I still want to hear what someone closer to the heartbeat has to say about it.

“Rock music doesn’t really exist as we knew it,” Clark says. “What happened with rock is it became country music: Bob Seger with a fiddle. When John started using a fiddle in the ’80s, and that would be country music now. My roots are Midwest influences. Anyone my age is influenced by The Stones, Dylan, Cash and Haggard.”

“I want my record to catch on with people who think country radio is too cheesy for their tastes,” he says. “I wanted to make a record that isn’t appealing to the lowest common denominator.”

With these shows this month, Clark – and the gutsy Telecaster-driven rock of Crane – will both get their chance to find that ground that exists between country and rock; a place both artists feel comfortable.

December 20
The Bluebird
Bloomington, Indiana
8:00pm
216 North Walnut Street (812) 336-3984.